Horoscopes By Drunk Editors

Scorpio (Oct. 23 – Nov. 21): The day before Thanksgiving, you will come down with a nasty bout of Amphibian Quail Sickness. The only known cure is putting a lime in- side of a coconut and drinking it all up. Hope you beat this.
Sagittarius (Nov. 22 – Dec. 21): Is the paint in your bathroom peeling more often than usual? It’s probably from all those showers your room- mate insists on taking at 5 AM while singing arias. At least you’ll know who to blame when Facilities doesn’t pass you for inspection.
Capricorn (Dec. 22 – Jan. 19): Two mice were stuck in a bucket of cream. The first mouse quickly gave up and drowned. But the second mouse swam frantically, kicking his legs faster and faster until he churned the whole bucket in the butter. Moral of the story: the first mouse didn’t have to worry about the cat wait- ing outside of the bucket.
Aquarius (Jan. 20 – Feb. 18): Did you know that pies were originally just jars to keep food in? Obviously the “jar” was made out of the medieval pie dough equivalent, but they somehow
managed to prevent rot/ bacteria from harming the filling over short periods of time. To honor those courageous inventors, you should eat lots of pie around the middle of the month.
Pisces (Feb. 19 – March 20): Every time some- one mentions a turkey this month, pretend like you’ve never heard of the creature, and make that person imitate a turkey call. It’ll be funny, I promise.
Aries (March 21 – April 19): You know what would be really bad this mini holiday season? If you slept through your alarm on your travel day. And then when you had scrambled to successfully book another travel reservation, the station got snowed in. And your fellow travelers started look- ing at you like a Donner Party member. But that’s totally not gonna hap- pen…
Taurus (April 20 – May 20): Riddle me this, ModSim-ers and ModSim Alumni: If there are 330 million Americans and each person eats 1/4 of a turkey and there are 100 million turkeys turned into Butterballs each November and turkeys re- produce at a rate of .89
per year, how long will it take before we resort to eating tofurkeys?
Gemini (May 21 – June 20): Oh. You’re gonna get stuck doing ALL of the project work over break because the rest of your team has had plans to fly home for WEEKS, and it just wouldn’t be fair to make them cancel on their families when you have time to do the work “any- way”?
Cancer (June 21 – July 22): Tell Taurus that we’ve actually been eating tofurkey for years. Those vegan scientists are get- ting good.
Leo (July 23 – Aug. 22):
Don’t go to sleep on the 10th until after 11:59 PM. You’ll miss out on the coolest thing of the semester if you do.
Virgo (Aug. 23 – Sept. 22): Have you ever tried to see how many fall leaves you can crumble up and stuff into you neighbor’s boots? No? Wow, you’re missing out.
Libra (Sept. 23 – Oct. 22): Bring Leo some warm milk on the 10th. They been working really hard, and could definitely use a good night’s sleep. Maybe tell them a bed time story.

SERV Updates

The Daily Table: Service Activity Leadership by Emily Yeh
Volunteer at the Daily Table in Dorchester! Daily Table is a nonprofit organization that makes affordable and healthy food available to people with low incomes. A group from Olin volunteers there every Saturday from 11am to 1pm – visit http://tinyurl.com/DailyTable to sign-up! If you have any questions, please contact Emily Yeh.

Blood Drive: Ariana Olson
Olin had a successful Fall Blood Drive this October. We received 29 presenting donors, and a total of 30 units of blood donated (including 2 Double Red donations). The drive was facilitated with the help of 6 Olin student volunteers. Thank you to all of the donors and volunteers for their time. Because the Red Cross has been in urgent need of blood, every unit donated has a huge impact. Look out for news about the Spring Blood Drive, which will be held in April.

E-Disco: Lead by Jeremy Garcia, Daniel Daughtery, Kim Winter, Micaela Chiang
Lauren Pudvan
We have had our new member meeting and have been assisting in various events for the Women’s Open House and Family Weekend at Olin. We also assisted in teaching a group of low income students at Dassault Systemes.

Big Brother Big Sister College Campus Program:
Big Brothers Big Sisters finalized all new Matches this month, and Bigs and Littles are now meeting regularly on Saturday afternoons. There are not as many Oliners in the program this year, but because of new Babson Bigs, there are more Matches overall. In coming months, the program plans to have more structured activities in conjunction with Babson and Olin clubs and organizations.

The Food Recovery Network:Needs leadership from students who can commit during the Spring semester. FRN is on pause until a new leadership team can form. Contact Mackenzie Frackleton if you’re interested!

*The Food Project: Aaron Greiner, Gaby Clarke
The Food Project engages youth and works on food justice issues through running 70 acres of farm in the Greater Boston area and the North Shore. They work on advocacy, youth development, and much more. Their farms, which are largely run by youth and volunteers, produce food that is sold at affordable prices at places like farmers markets. They have volunteer opportunities at all of their farms throughout the week.

*Gique: Ashley Funk
Gique is a Boston-based nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization which exists to inspire and educate youth in STEAM. Through after-school programs and educational workshops, Gique builds a community full of the next great thinkers, leaders, & makers. Workshops through the afterschool program occur Wednesday evenings at the Boys and Girls Club of Dorchestor, and additional workshops take place throughout the semester.

*Charles River Center: Emma Price
The Charles River Center strives “to empower and support people with developmental disabilities by offering high-quality, individualized opportunities that foster independence and community inclusion.” They have after school, job placement, weekend, and after work programs as well as events (like 5Ks and Special Olympics) that can all benefit from additional volunteers! If you are looking for a fun and very rewarding volunteer service, I highly suggest it!

*Newton Food Pantry: Logan Sweet
Located in the basement of Newton City Hall, the Newton Food Pantry focuses on healthy, fresh food. By working with community gardens and local farms, they provide produce in addition to non-perishables. There are volunteer opportunities on Wednesdays in the morning, afternoon, and evening.

*Students are volunteering for these organizations as part of Sara Hendren’ and Deb Chachra’s Critical Designer, Activist Engineer Course

Olin Electric Motorsports Update

Olin’s formula team is gearing up for another competition season in the Formula SAE Collegiate Design Series. This year we will attend either Formula SAE Electric in Lincoln, Nebraska from June 21-24 (currently waitlisted) and/or Formula North in Toronto from June 1-4 (accepted!). Students and professors can rejoice as we will not be at competition in the middle of finals week this spring!
You may have noticed we changed our name. With the team’s transition over the last year from research to competitive racing, it seemed a fitting time to rebrand. REVO (Research of Electric Vehicles at Olin) has been replaced with Olin Electric Motorsports. On campus you can just call us Formula. Now when you wear your REVO branded gear you can feel like one of the cool kids, here before we started racing.

Mk. 2: The Technical Breakdown
With the many, many lessons learned in designing and building Mk. 1, we have chosen a system architecture for this year that should reduce our high voltage complexity and cut system weight dramatically. Here are the specs:
107 horsepower
425 lbs dry weight, 600 lbs gross vehicle weight (GVW)
Enstroj 100 kW Emrax 228 outrunner motor
BAMOCAR-D3-400-400 motor controller
Chain drive Torsen differential transmission
Chain drive steering
Multilink rear suspension
20+ custom designed PCBs
High-speed CAN bus
Continued robust firmware development
Live vehicle dynamics sensing and feedback
And more exciting projects in the works!

AHS Thoughts

Registration fast approaches! Some thoughts on AHS from someone who took a lot of failed attempts to find an AHS concentration that fit:

The approach to humanities that sees it as a supplement or fortifier to STEM education is effective for some people and ineffective for others. I got little out of a Drawing I class by framing it as a way to up my MechE skills. Then I tried to take an education class from the perspective of an engineer looking to teach engineering. I’m sure that it works well for many people to have their entire curriculum working toward one unified goal or idea, but with all the talk of cross-disciplinary integration here, it took a while to realize that I could keep my peas and carrots on opposite sides of the plate. So, if by chance you were looking for permission: contain multitudes, if you want.

Something that worked well for me was to sit down with an hour or two free and go through the entire Wellesley course catalogue, marking off classes with names that interested me. Once I’d gotten through the whole list, I reviewed all of the class descriptions and wrote down groupings that emerged as concentration possibilities. I came up with two that I was really excited about and ran them by my advisor. I ended up with a concentration in history, specifically nationalism and partition – something I never, ever would have guessed that I would like. Because history was boring in high school, and I “just wasn’t a history person”. Turns out history is very different at the collegiate level, which lets professors get specific enough to do their subjects justice. And there were so many other options to explore – anthropology, psychology, American studies, political science, religion, classics…

Investing time in finding the right AHS concentration was arduous but worth it. I could babble endlessly about how much the history classes I’ve taken have enriched my life. There’s an amazing breadth and depth of opportunity in the arts, humanities and social sciences available to you, if you’re interested in finding AHS that does more for you than check off a requirement or further your engineering education.

PS. Fran Malino, My Favorite Professor Ever, is offering a seminar next spring on the history of anti-Semitism. So. Just a casual plug.

Horoscopes by Drunk Editors

Libra (Sept. 23 – Oct. 22): You’ll be surprised by what you can achieve. Stay close to your friends. It is possible to get lost on campus.
Scorpio (Oct. 23 – Nov. 21): Get out of your dorm room and try to find a place on campus that no one else knows exists. Be adventurous (or lie).
Sagittarius (Nov. 22 – Dec. 21): Let me guess your Halloween costume: drunk college student at a party?
Capricorn (Dec. 22 – Jan. 19): Every single printer is going to run out of paper on Thursday, October 13th.
Aquarius (Jan. 20 – Feb. 18): A beber y a tragar, queelmundosevaa acabar.
Pisces (Feb. 19 – March 20): There are only so many days out the year when drinking a pumpkin spice latte is acceptable/ possible. Take advantage of it while you can.
Aries (March 21 – April 19): If you have 2 over- due p-sets, 6 hours of meetings, reading for that Wellesley class, and code that even the NINJAs can’t figure out, why wouldn’t you go into Boston for the weekend?
Taurus (April 20 – May 20): Oh, dear. look at the time. The little horoscope fairies have long passed out. Here, write your own: ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Gemini (May 21 – June 20): Do you know all the courses you need in order to graduate? (Seniors, here’s looking at you).
Cancer (June 21 – July 22): Professors love frantic emails 5 hours before the deadline. Remember that for your next lab.
Leo (July 23 – Aug. 22):
Fall only comes once a year. For like, a quarter of the year, but you know what I mean. Take those Instagram pictures while you can, soon you’ll have more frozen water than anyone can deal with.
Virgo (Aug. 23 – Sept. 22): When homework threatens to crush your very soul, just remember that Fall TV is back, and just about everything is up-to-date on Netflix. You will get through this.

Oh, Hey There, Olin

Letter From The Editor, better late than never, right?
Hello to the 80 some- odd first years and exchange students that I’ve never met before (and in the case of the exchange students, never will…).
How are you liking Olin, and how is the work load treating you? (Just wait until literally half the school tries to print posters on the same night, and one of the poster printers is broken).
For those of you that either don’t check your emails or just don’t care that much about what I write when I send out Frankly Speaking, I’m not on campus this semester. But because I’m not working or studying abroad or volunteering or doing any- thing remotely useful, y’all still get Frankly Speaking. Aren’t you lucky?
And now I get to nag you about contributing to this newspaper that magically shows up around the first of the month. SIDE NOTE: huge thanks to Mitch Cieminski and Justin Kunimune for editing and printing and folding and distributing. They do a lot to make this paper happen; as in, it wouldn’t be sitting in the Dining Hall without them.
Frankly Speaking also doesn’t exist without sub- missions. If you like writing, drawing, creating puzzles, spouting opinions, telling stories, or even rambling on in complete gibberish, SEND IT IN FOR PRINT.
This is a newspaper of, by, and for the people. Your submissions are not vet- ted, censored, or restricted. Some pieces need to lose the occasional word/sentence/ paragraph for clarity and/or formatting, and as always, I reserve the right to request that poems be kept to a mini- mum.
But if you want to write an op/ed praising the analogue computer or draw a maze that leads the reader through the margins of the paper to eventually find a series of key words that spell out a secret message, IT WILL BE PRINTED.
Just submit. You have nothing to lose, and all the recognition/notoriety to gain.
Jayce
P.S. I have this random column of space, so I’m go- ing to impart some wisdom that I’ve gained from working on a house with structures built by less-than-commend- able people.
Do not use nails. Specifically, don’t use nails on structures that may need to be replaced or when the nail will be at an angle that will make it nigh impossible to be removed from.
Don’t use four different types/sizes of nails to secure a singular piece of hardware. Don’t use the wrong nail for the wrong job. Don’t hammer the nail until the head is flush with the metal bracket.
Just use screws. Screws go in and come out easily. Screws are your friend. Screws love you.
<3

Out of the Ashes – Chapter 7

[A CLANSMAN CLAIMS TO HAVE KILLED ONE OF YOUR ORDER. WHAT WILL YOU DO?]

You look into his eyes and he stares back. Wariness flickers through his gaze for a moment and his hand twitches toward his belt, but you look deeper and see–

Revulsion. Rage. You should not exist, his gaze seems to say. You belong in hell, not on earth. And beneath that…

Sorrow. Pain. Loss.

“I’m sorry,” you say instinctively, and for a moment he looks surprised. Not the response he was expecting, you suppose. Anger, perhaps. Indignation or outrage, maybe. Not this. “It seems war has taken its toll on all of us. I would hear of your battle, if you are willing.”

There is a long moment of silence before he stares down at his boots. “It was not so glorious a deed,” he admits grudgingly.

“But it was done nonetheless,” you reply. “He had comrades. Friends, perhaps. Family. Knowing his fate will be good for them.”

“Will it truly?” The Plainsman looks up at you, a ragged edge in his voice.

“No,” you say. “But uncertainty is worse.”

“You may be right,” he says. “I will tell you–”

“It is time,” Ambassador Yesui cuts in as one of the courtiers beckons to her. “Come, Zhenjin.”

“–some other time, then.” The man – Zhenjin – bows to you and turns away, and you remember–

You remember wind howling across a cloud-darkened sea of dying grass. You remember the taste of tea, warm and rich – as foreign to you as kindness. You remember a father’s fondness, a warrior’s pride; a dying man’s resignation.

What a small world we live in, you think with a sigh. What a small, bloody, cruel world.

It’s not long before another courtier beckons to Lord Anselm. He steps forward, red coat swishing, and you and Adrian follow close behind.

~~
The palace doors swing open silently, several tons of perfectly-balanced steel pivoting on massive columns. You look around as you enter; the palace’s interior walls are painted to match the city at dusk – ten thousand buildings glowing by lamplight, roads and thoroughfares branching like the roots of some great tree.

A faux horizon calls to you in every direction, mist-shrouded peaks and moonlit lakes rendered with lifelike precision. As you look up, you see a night sky of black velvet studded with shining diamonds, each star a gleaming point of light in the darkness. And the floor–

The floor–

The floor is a painting of an underwater grotto filled with fantastic creatures and figures in bright finery, a riot of color captured in infinitesimal detail. You can’t help but wonder what kind of genius could have produced a work of such magnitude…

Then the figures move beneath you, a shoal of fish flickers by in an iridescent torrent, and you realize it’s real. A caldera filled with water, glass walls and ceiling cunningly placed for men and women to walk alongside the wonders of the sea…

The sheer cost of producing such a structure – acquiring the glass, setting it in place so snugly that not a drop of water could escape, capturing the aquarium’s inhabitants and keeping them fed…

Lord Anselm seems vaguely impressed, but Adrian is all but gaping at the sight. “It’s beautiful,” he whispers.

Lady Jin smiles at your expressions and steps forward, descending a great glass staircase mere feet from the entrance. “This way, Honored Guests,” she says, and you follow.

You’re surrounded by people when you step off the stairs – servants bearing platters, grave ministers in dark robes, scions of the Great Houses in fine silk seated at food-laden tables. A gilded dais sits at the far end of the hall, obscured by shimmering curtains.

The throne.

Soft strains of music mix with the hum of conversation as a herald glances down at his scroll.

“Ambassador Anselm of Imvarr,” he calls out. “Lady Jin Yuehai.” Every eye in the banquet hall turns to regard the four of you – a wave of polite applause washes across the room, nobles and ambassadors and ministers giving you their best courtly smiles.

You can’t help but remember your superior’s words: “He who smiles widest hides the sharpest knife…”

Lord Anselm grins then, his manner brisk and carefree. “Time to get down to business.”

~~

The Emperor is displeased. Influence rolls off him in waves, heating the surrounding air as you approach the dais. A mere suggestion of warmth soon turns into the relentless heat of the midday sun, but you ignore it.

You have been through worse.

Lord Anselm’s expression doesn’t change a whit as he strides through the furnace, but you spy a bead of moisture running down his forehead. Adrian and Lady Jin are not so lucky – the noblewoman’s face is flushed and drenched with sweat. Your colleague has it even worse, stumbling over his own feet and gasping for breath as he contends with smothering Influence.

First the torturer and now this, you think. Are all kings so desperate to prove their power?

The four of you stop at the base of the dais. Lady Jin falls to her knees, forehead to the ground, and the three of you take a knee beside her. “Long Live the Emperor,” the four you say in unison, but the suffocating presence does not recede.

Instead, there’s a rustle behind the curtains, and the Emperor of Reshan replies: “Welcome, ambassadors of Imvarr.”

Son of Heaven, Lord of Ten Thousand Years. The voice that emerges from the curtains is smooth and clear, but there is steel in it. This is the voice of absolute authority, every word bearing an almost unthinkable weight. “We are glad to have you in our courts. We trust our hospitality has been… sufficient?”

“Very much so, your Highness,” your superior replies, ignoring the scorching heat. “We have no complaints–”

Dark blood oozes from Adrian’s nostrils, and he pitches forward with an agonized groan. You catch him before he hits the ground, draping a protective cloak of Power over his form as concerned muttering breaks out amongst the onlookers, and anger rears its ugly head yet again.

“Your Highness,” you say quietly; Lord Anselm winces but doesn’t intervene. “Don’t you think it’s a little warm in here?”

The heat doubles in intensity as the Emperor brings the full weight of his Influence down, but you stand firm. “Offer the Reshanese all the respect they are due,” you remember Lord Anselm saying, “but accept no insult. We are here as equals.” You envelop your companions in an aegis of Power, turning the worst of the magic aside, but it will not hold forever–

Then the murderous heat dissipates, and the Son of Heaven laughs long and loud. “Our presence tends to overpower those of… lesser strength,” he says. “We will keep your companions’ frailty in mind, next we meet.”

“Thank you, your Highness,” you say.

“Of course,” he replies. “Rise, then, and enjoy the festivities.”

~~

The four of you get to your feet and retreat into the crowd. The dignitaries give you a wide berth, not wishing to risk the Emperor’s displeasure, and you take a seat at one of the tables. Adrian collapses into a chair and lays his head on the wood, eyes closed.

“That was close,” Lord Anselm says. “I know I told you not to take any insult lying down, but…”

“I think my life just flashed past my eyes,” Lady Jin murmurs, snagging a glass of wine from a passing servant’s tray and downing it in a single gulp. “Please never do that again.”

You lower your head. “I apologize.” I was operating at peak capacity before we arrived in Reshan, you think. But now my judgement is lapsing. “It–”

Adrian cuts you off. “He’s so strong,” he groans. “God. I gave it everything I had, but he crushed me without even trying.”

“It will not happen again,” you say to nobody in particular.

~~

It’s not long before Lady Jin leads Lord Anselm away to confer with the Minister of Finance, an especially grave looking man in dark robes. You listen in on their conversation for a few moments, but it’s nothing but pleasantries and honeyed words.

“How are you feeling?” You ask Adrian after a moment.

“Like shit,” he says, giving you a wobbly grin. “But it’s getting better. Thanks for the help.”

“Think nothing of it,” you say, as a servant loads up your table with food – a rainbow of spiced meats and pickled fish and dozens of other dishes you cannot identify. “You should eat.”

“Maybe,” he replies, eyeing the luxurious spread. “There’s so much of it,” he says. “Where do I even start?”

“Wherever you like,” you say after a moment’s thought. “It’s not going to disappear.”

Adrian heaps his plate with a morsel from each dish before digging in, hesitantly at first and then with the haste of a starving man. You raise an eyebrow, and your colleague freezes with his chopsticks in his mouth when he finally notices. “Magic is hungry work,” he says defensively, and you can’t help but laugh…

Then you hear footsteps over the murmuring and music. You look up to see Ambassador Yesui approach your table cautiously, her bodyguards not far behind. “May I sit?” She asks in the language of her people.

“Please,” you reply in kind. “Lord Anselm is busy at the moment, but you are welcome to wait with us.” Adrian nods in agreement.

Yesui inclines her head and beckons to Zhenjin, and the two of them sit down. “You speak our tongue well,” she says after a short silence.

“You are too kind, Ambassador,” you reply. “How may I be of service?”

“Zhenjin is recollecting the tale he promised you,” she says, “and I simply wish to talk.”

“Ah,” you reply. “Did you have any particular topic in mind?”

“Well,” Yesui begins, “I cannot help but notice that Lord Anselm is thirty feet away from your person…”

“He is well-protected,” you reply. “No harm will befall him while I am alive.”

“You seem awfully confident in your abilities,” she goes on. “Defying the Emperor was counterproductive at best; suicidal at worst.”

“It had to be done,” you say, angling your head toward the Prime Minister. The delegates of Reshan’s conquered territories descend upon him in a gaggle of ostentation, bowing and scraping and proffering gifts. “Imvarr is no vassal state. We are equals.”

Yesui’s eyes gleam in the lamplight. “I suppose,” she murmurs with wry amusement. “They remind me of dogs, baring throat and belly for scraps from their master’s table.”

You shrug. “An obedient hound will always have food, warmth, and shelter.”

“You should know,” Yesui replies, but there is neither heat nor venom in her voice. “Have you ever been free to choose your own path, Knight?”

“Have you?” you ask in return. “A wolf chooses to hunt; a dog chooses to serve. But they are both slaves to hunger, are they not?”

“True,” Yesui says, and you see something that looks like respect in her eyes. “But a dog depends on the kindness of its master; a wolf depends on speed, cunning and the cooperation of its pack. They are beholden to none but their equals.”

“In the lean winter, a dog can count on its owner,” you counter. “But the wolf must find larger quarry or perish, and a bear – even tired from its long sleep – is no easy prey.”

“I cannot dispute that,” Yesui whispers, and for a moment you worry that you have gone too far. Then she smiles warmly and says: “But that is why I am here, yes? Perhaps the time has come for the wolf to find a master.”

~~

WHAT IS YOUR REPLY?
1. [Critical. “For all your talk about freedom, it seems you are more dog than wolf.”]
2. [Neutral. “Perhaps. Good luck, Ambassador – you’ll need it.”]
3. [Supportive. “There is no shame in survival. I wish you all the best, Ambassador.”]

SERV Updates

The Daily Table: Service Activity Leadership by Emily Yeh
Volunteer at the Daily Table in Dorchester! Daily Table is a nonprofit organization that makes affordable and healthy food available to people with low incomes. A group from Olin will be volunteering there every Saturday from 11am to 1pm, starting in October – check the Carpediem mailing list or visit http://tinyurl.com/DailyTable to sign-up! If you have any questions, please contact Emily Yeh.

The Food Recovery Network: Led by Mackenzie Frackleton and Issac Vandor with GROW. Come to GROW dinners every Thursday at 6PM under the clocks to be a part of our discussion about shaping FRN this year! We need volunteers, especially those who can drive, those who would be willing to volunteer their car, or those who can use one of the Zipcars at Babson. SERV will reimburse mileage expenses as part of service funding, too! We also need underclassmen who are looking to take a leadership role soon, so please contact Mackenzie if you’re interested.

*Gique: Ashley Funk
Gique is a Boston-based nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization which exists to inspire and educate youth in STEAM. Through after-school programs and educational workshops, Gique builds a community full of the next great thinkers, leaders, & makers. Workshops through the afterschool program occur Wednesday evenings at the Boys and Girls Club of Dorchestor, and additional workshops take place throughout the semester.

*Charles River Center: Emma Price
The Charles River Center strives “to empower and support people with developmental disabilities by offering high-quality, individualized opportunities that foster independence and community inclusion.” They have after school, job placement, weekend, and after work programs as well as events (like 5Ks and Special Olympics) that can all benefit from additional volunteers! If you are looking for a fun and very rewarding volunteer service, I highly suggest it!

*Newton Food Pantry: Logan Sweet
Located in the basement of Newton City Hall, the Newton Food Pantry focuses on healthy, fresh food. By working with community gardens and local farms, they provide produce in addition to non-perishables. There are volunteer time slots on Wednesdays in the morning, afternoon, and evening, and they especially need people who speak Russian.

*The Food Project: Aaron Greiner, Gaby Clarke
The Food Project engages youth and works on food justice issues through running 70 acres of farm in the Greater Boston area and the North Shore. The work on advocacy, youth development, and much more. Their farms, which are largely run by youth and volunteers, produce food that is sold at affordable prices at places like farmers markets. They have volunteer opportunities at all of their farms throughout the week.

Big Brother Big Sister College Campus Program: Big Brothers Big Sisters recruited a lot of Oliners at club fair, and is currently working to match each volunteer to the ideal Little. New Bigs will meet their new Littles for the first time in late October, and bi-weekly outings at Babson will begin in early November.

Blood Drive: Olin’s fall Blood Drive is October 14. Donor and Volunteer signups will be available starting late September. Lookout for the signup table in the dining hall as the date approaches! Contact Frankie (Frances.Devanbu@students.olin.edu) or Ariana (Ariana.Olson@students.olin.edu) with any questions.

*Students are volunteering for these organizations as part of Sara Hendren’s Critical Design Activist Engineer Course